Anonyme asked:

Hello, how did you go about becoming a research assistant? Did you just ask around? Xx

I applied to summer research fellowships. This involved an application and several letters of recommendation. If you Google it, you’ll find a bunch. The standards for getting a summer fellowship are pretty high, so make sure your application is good. Standards are lower if they are offered at your undergraduate school.

I applied to my school’s summer fellowship as a back up and applied to several other fellowships, withdrawing my application from others once I got my top choice. MAKE SURE you tell your home school — especially if you are being hosted by a faculty member — that you are using your school’s fellowship as a back-up. It’s only fair and kind. I told this to my faculty sponsor, he approved, and he even wrote me a recommendation for my other applications.

If you’re asking how I got my regular position as a research assistant during the school year, and my advice about it, see this and this previous answer.

Holy shit. Holy shit. Holy shit.
That is the guy I am working with as a research assistant this summer.

Holy shit. Holy shit. Holy shit.

That is the guy I am working with as a research assistant this summer.

When le boyfriend comes home, hopefully, with a renewed green card.

When le boyfriend comes home, hopefully, with a renewed green card.

The answer, via my principle investigator!

The answer, via my principle investigator!

I will let you know when I know.
The most I could imagine is that KOH ionizes in H2O to K+ OH-, which latches onto the glutamate to make it polar and therefore more soluable? But it wouldn’t be glutamate anymore, and glutamate is the needed substrate for our experiment, so I just don’t fucking know!

I will let you know when I know.

The most I could imagine is that KOH ionizes in H2O to K+ OH-, which latches onto the glutamate to make it polar and therefore more soluable? But it wouldn’t be glutamate anymore, and glutamate is the needed substrate for our experiment, so I just don’t fucking know!

cauliflowerqueen asked:

So I'm in Gen Chem right now and I saw your problem and it sounds similar to what we just finished covering, though I don't fully understand the problem. You have excess H2O and need to downsize it with accurate proportions of solvents or...? Sorry, I didn't fully understand the problem presented.

Lemme just copy and paste what I sent my principle investigator:

I’m still working on the RCR protocol, and it’s proving to be a beast of a general chemistry problem.

 As I was scaling down the protocol on which my RCR protocol will be based from 1.6 mL to 100 microliters total volume, I thought I should look up the solubility of things so that my proposed solutions would actually work. In doing so, I found that the solubility of glutamate and malate at 25 *C made not only my proposed solutions theoretically impossible, but also the protocol for glutamate/ malate solutions that you had in the blue binder.
You propose mixing 0.74 g of glutamate in 10 mL of H20
The solubility of glutamate in H20 is 8.64 g glutamate/L H2O.
Theoretically, you should only be able to dissolve 0.0864 g of glutamate in 10 mL of H2O at 25 *C.
Now I am really perplexed. After all, your protocol worked, right?

In your protocol, you also “added KOH until in solution” — which I am presuming to mean add until it doesn’t dissolve. Did KOH dramatically increase the solubility of the glutamate for this to work? KOH has ionic bonds which are far more soluable in water than the covalent bonds in glutamate, however, I am not sure how excess KOH affects the solubility of the glutamate.

thatscienceguy:

Fire. Dancing. To. Music. On. A. Table… SOMEONE MADE A 2 DIMENSIONAL BUNSEN TUBE!

Anonyme asked:

I'm looking at colleges since I'm closely approaching my junior year and I know I want to major in biochemistry with premed I'm stuck between IU and Purdue my dilemma is that Purdue has a fantastic science program, but IU has a medical school I don't know which one I should pursue? I'm from Indiana so I would like to stay in state for undergrad My guidance counselor said I will probably get into both of I keep up the good work! Any advice? A better science school or a school with a med school?

Hmm…. I don’t know the extent to which undergraduate schools connect or provide access to their medical school as a resource. I mean this in both intangible advantages — it would be cool to be amongst medical students if their student bodies often blend with one another — and in terms of official “perks,” like attending medical school seminars or what have you.

I have heard that medical schools slightly privilege those from their undergrad. But you’d have to search around SDN to confirm this.

Overall, though, I would go with the better science program. Your research opportunities would be better, and your program would be more rigorous as preparation for that beast called the MCAT. Hard programs will make the MCAT easier. More than the slight advantage allotted to those that go to the undergraduate institution home to the medical school to which they are applying, the MCAT is a far bigger determinant of your appeal to medical schools.

Also, many studies have shown that the academic quality of peers is strongly correlated to better academic quality in those around them. As in, a kid with bad grades can be put into the “gifted classes” and find his grades improving despite the harder material. If you want citations, I can get them out of my sociology book, but trust me, there are intangible things like this you should consider. A better science program means better science students, which means a better academic environment. Yes, you could make the argument that medical students could provide the same effect, but studies have only shown this effect to be true when you are in close and constant contact with the academically gifted around you. Medical students would, I’d imagine, be more distanced.

I’d go with the better science program.

I’m trying this thing upon the word of hexaneandheels that it may be possible to visualize organic mechanisms in such a way that they are more easily memorizable/comprehensible.
I only dabbled in trying this for my last exam and, for some reason, it seemed natural to make my imaginings dramatic. Breaking bonds had the sound of shattering glass, electrons were little electric, yellow glowing and fizzing bullets, fizzling buzzes accompanied the movement of electrons, crashes occurred and flashes of bright light happened when electrons hooked onto an atom. The general dramatic feel of my imagined visuals was that of above.
I’ll have to try it more. It take a lot of brain power, but I think it does significantly increase learning speed of mechanisms.

I’m trying this thing upon the word of hexaneandheels that it may be possible to visualize organic mechanisms in such a way that they are more easily memorizable/comprehensible.

I only dabbled in trying this for my last exam and, for some reason, it seemed natural to make my imaginings dramatic. Breaking bonds had the sound of shattering glass, electrons were little electric, yellow glowing and fizzing bullets, fizzling buzzes accompanied the movement of electrons, crashes occurred and flashes of bright light happened when electrons hooked onto an atom. The general dramatic feel of my imagined visuals was that of above.

I’ll have to try it more. It take a lot of brain power, but I think it does significantly increase learning speed of mechanisms.

I’ve been working on this fucking beast of a general chemistry problem for hours. I need to scale down a protocol to make it fit to the volume of our instrument.
General chemistry deserves more respect than it gets for how useful and fundamental it is.
Now I find that the proposed solutions in the protocol I am downsizing has glutamate solutions that, theoretically, shouldn’t work. The soluability of the glutamate solute in H2O is too low for the volume of solvent H2O they propose. Unless, of course, excess KOH — for which there is no provided nor obvious explanation for its addition — dramatically increases soluability of glutamate in H2O or in general.
Anyone know?
Google is not helping.

I’ve been working on this fucking beast of a general chemistry problem for hours. I need to scale down a protocol to make it fit to the volume of our instrument.

General chemistry deserves more respect than it gets for how useful and fundamental it is.

Now I find that the proposed solutions in the protocol I am downsizing has glutamate solutions that, theoretically, shouldn’t work. The soluability of the glutamate solute in H2O is too low for the volume of solvent H2O they propose. Unless, of course, excess KOH — for which there is no provided nor obvious explanation for its addition — dramatically increases soluability of glutamate in H2O or in general.

Anyone know?

Google is not helping.

Boot vanity.
Yes, talentismoreerotic, those are my boots.

Boot vanity.

Yes, talentismoreerotic, those are my boots.

I’ve seen a lot of doctor’s quick and inaccurate signatures over the course of my semester as an intern. I decided I should have a quick and inaccurate signature for my lab work since I so often have to label many things to distinguish them from other’s in shared lab space.
My infinity ring did the trick.

I’ve seen a lot of doctor’s quick and inaccurate signatures over the course of my semester as an intern. I decided I should have a quick and inaccurate signature for my lab work since I so often have to label many things to distinguish them from other’s in shared lab space.

My infinity ring did the trick.

Ooooooh!!!!
Helpful followers today. Ya’ll are great.
Thank you!

Ooooooh!!!!

Helpful followers today. Ya’ll are great.

Thank you!